AICON

Open Data Standards

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Speaker: Alex Torpey, Seton Hall University.

Collecting and making data open is what so many cities want to do, and so many private tech companies want, but there is a major standardization problem, especially in less tech focused areas or cities, or smaller towns that also want to help. What’s the solution? Government legislation/policy? Private company leadership? An independent organization that creates standards? How are governments bought into using them? Additionally, there are many policies in place at various of levels of government that prevent or don’t explicitly allow this, which further hampers progress. The professor I teach with in the masters program here at Seton Hall University received a grant from Bloomberg to look into this, and we’d like to present what we’re working on.

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Protecting your privates

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Speaker: Neil J. Armstrong, SQS.

For the past number of years and going forward, the concept of privacy is becoming eroded and the devices we carry around all day long are one of the major culprits.

During Neil’s presentation, he will talk about some of the channels in which your personal information is acquired and used for various purposes.

There will also be a live demo from a selection, including wireless tracking code that Neil developed, or the framework he developed for assessing privacy violations in mobile applications.

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Integration of Software Development and Software Maintenance

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Speaker: David Bustard, University of Ulster.

Software development transition covers the activities associated with transferring responsibility for a software product from a development team to a maintenance team.

This is a difficult aspect of software development but is one that has received little attention in the literature, especially in relation to agile development. The purpose of this talk is to help address that deficiency. It does so by clarifying the transition concept for agile development, identifying challenges in this process, and then proposing ways to improve the activities involved.

The discussion is illustrated with examples of practice at the software company Kainos, where agile techniques are used in both development and maintenance. The discussion includes a specific transition case study in a UK Government Cabinet Office project.

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Law Enforcement and Technology

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Speaker: Alex Torpey, Seton Hall University.

This is a big issue in the US, and I know in other parts of the world too. We are not just thinking about security and investigations, but the holistic approach to policing, and finding ways to help a police department connect with a community and enlist them in their mission to protect and serve.

How does technology help that? How does it hurt it?

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The Human Connection of Software

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Speaker: David Anderson, Liberty IT.

As a large company, we have a significant “book of business” to run, but at the centre of the Insurance business is a deeply personal relationship with our customer and we help them when they need it most. We have a constant drive to put the individual first and ensure our technology delights and makes a difference to your day to day. Regardless if you are a Policy Holder, a business partner or a technology user (internal or external).

This panel discusses how important the Human Element is to the world of technology and how we must not forget to think about people. It will also discuss a few key areas where this is most critical (and are not always the most obvious choices).

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Abusing your code on every commit

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Speaker: Caoimhin Graham, Kainos.

Security can often be a bottom heavy process where testing and review occurs at the end of the software development lifecycle just prior to go-live.

I would like to discuss different methods you can employ to automate large parts of the security process and integrate this into your build/deployment process to minimise the possibility of surprises either before or after you go live.

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Software Quality is for life not just for QA

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Speaker: Gareth Burns, SQS.

In the last few years, with the maturity of cloud technologies and different software delivery methods, the demands on software have dramatically increased.

Applications have never been so ubiquitous in our daily lives. Users expect applications to be constantly available, up to date and defect free.

They also expect clear communication and engagement. Any deviation from this can impact a company’s reputation, directly impacting the profits.

Over the last few years we have all witnessed this with Twitter storms and media coverage on everything from banking to video game releases.

Quality is no longer just the concern of the testers. It’s now a real hot topic for all aspects of a business, from marketing to operations. It has a symbiotic relationship with a business strategy and finding that perfect blend that suits a business is challenging, but can pay large dividends.

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The Offline Web – Not an oxymoron

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Speaker: Alex Turnbull, Kainos.

We live in a disconnected world. However this should not adversely affect our experiences when using mobile web applications offline.

Using existing HTML5 and JavaScript technologies it is possible to create great offline user experiences that not only make a mobile web application work offline but positively affect the application in terms of speed, reliability and usability.

More specifically we look at the technology that can be used to create offline first web applications, including how to cache pages/assets and how to store data using different browser storage options.

We will explore the offline first design pattern and why it is an important factor to consider when developing web apps.

We will also look at how this approach is becoming more and more important in developing countries where people are only getting access to the internet now.

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Cyber Security & Internet of Things

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Speaker: Jonny Crawford, Microfocus.

Thousands of identity thefts are being highlighted recently, such as TALK TALK hitting the headlines.

Username and passwords are a big security issue. Multi factor authentication can make various forms of security work together and be a viable option for all business.

Often, when an organization commits and invests their time and resources in a two factor authentication solution, they do so to meet their needs at the time. Too often, that same organization finds themselves implementing yet another solution to meet new needs.

Most organizations have some private information (financial, customer, regulated, etc.) that requires an added level of user verification not possible with traditional credentials. It’s that type of information that may warrant another level of authentication based on the situation. Is the requester in the building, as expected, or across the country or beyond? Is he using a known device or one not seen before? Perhaps there is other criteria from which you want to control the authentication experience.

We would like to talk about risk based access control that enables you to match the type of authentication to the potential risk of the information or service being accessed.

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